The Great Moments of Change

With the twentieth century gradually coming to an end, times have perceptibly changed. During the golden Era of human existence, when man depended more on faith, a clay statuette of Dronacharya was capable of inspiring and training an expert archer like Eklavya. Then only a casual desire of Meera was sufficient to make Krishna appear and accompany her to dance. Inspired by her total devotion and dedication to her blind husband, Gandhari had chosen to cover her eyes with a bandage. The energy her unexposed sight had accumulate, generated such a great supernatural visual force that by just casting a glance she could make the body of Duryodhan invincible. During those days blessings were considered no less important than invaluable gifts. On the other hand, an elevated saintly person could inflict irreparable damage to an errant simply by throwing a curse. Such miracles were dependent on the intensity of feelings and faith in the objective. The efficacy of boons and banes were time tested and could be relied upon in any eventuality. Now, times have changed for worse. The human race is incapable of thinking beyond its physical existence. "Soul" has ceased to have any meaning. Human need is now-a-days confined to the narrow field of acquisition of tools of physical comforts, luxury and social status. This is unadulterated materialism (Pratyakshavad). We have on our own adopted a culture where seeing is believing and the sanctity of truth lies only in immediate physical demonstration. Any other virtuous thought or action, which is likely to bear fruit after a period of gestation, is looked down upon with disgust. Since soul is invincible and Almighty God does not appear performing tasks in a particular visible form at a particular place, both soul and God are considered non-existent.

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